Footnoting for Foods

Year 12 Food Technology

When you write an essay you include quotes, paraphrasing and statistics from books, websites and other sources to support your point of view. You need to acknowledge the source you have used by adding a footnote into your essay for each source used, every time you use the source. These footnotes show how much you have researched, and help your teacher locate the source if they want to check the information.

When you write an assignment, you must include footnotes when you:

           Quote directly from a source word for word.

OR

           Paraphrase a source.

Paraphrasing means: to write your own version of someone’s words or alter someone’s words although the idea expressed is still theirs. You can paraphrase if the information that you have found is too long to quote or is not clear.

You still need to include a bibliography even if you are adding footnotes.

 An essay with a quote and a footnote

The example below shows a single quotation mark at the start and the end of the quote and then a footnote.

 

Paraphrasing with footnotes

The example below shows that  two footnotes have been made using paraphrases from the same book.

 

HOW TO MAKE FOOTNOTES

You can use the website Bibme to automatically generate your references  at http://www.bibme.org/or you can follow the steps below.


 

 

 

 

 

 

1. When you add a quote or a paraphrase, after the full stop, go to the Word ribbon at the top of the screen.
2. Click on the Insert tab.
3. Choose Footnote from the list.
4. A dialog box will appear.
5. Click  on the Insert button at the bottom of the box.  This will add a tiny number at the end of the sentence.

 

 

 

 

 

Your cursor will automatically go to the bottom of the page where a line and the number one appear; this is the spot where you list the book or websites that you have used.

What to include for a book:

1. Author surname (comma) followed by first initial (full stop then comma)

2. Year of publication (comma)

3. Title of the book in italics (comma)

4. Edition of this book in italics inside brackets (comma)

5. Publisher (comma)

6. Place of publication (comma)

7. Page number

See the example below:

Heath, G, McKenzie, H & Tully L., 2010, Food Solutions Food and Technology Units 3 & 4 (Third Edition), Pearson Education, Sydney, p. 26

The second time you reference a source you only have to write:

1. Author surname (comma) followed by first initial (full stop)

2. Page number your information is from. Begin with p.

See the example below:

Heath, G. p. 38

If there is no author then write the title of the article or page.

See the example below:

Meat and Livestock Australia


 What to include for a Magazine:

1.Title of the magazine in italics (comma)

2.Publisher (comma)

3.Place of publication (comma)

4. Date of publication (comma)

5. Volume number (vol.)

See the example below:

Gourmet Traveller, ACP Magazines Ltd, Sydney Australia, 30th March 2011, vol. 3

What to include for a website:

1. Title of the page in italics (colon)

2. URL, website address eg. www...(semi colon)

3. Date accessed

See the example below:

Meat and Livestock Australia: www.mla.com.au; 22nd May 2013

 

What to include for a television program:

1. Title of the program (comma)

2. Channel on which it was shown (comma)

3. Day of the week followed by date

See the example below:

Jamie’s Thirty Minute Meals, Channel 10, Sunday 30th January 2011

 

What to include for an interview with an expert in the field:

1. Their name (comma)

2. Their position (comma)

3. Main cooking experience (comma)

4. Location of interview (comma)

 See the example below:

Shannon Bennett, Owner of Vue de Monde restaurant, Head Chef, Melbourne

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

What is a Bibliography?
•A bibliography is a list of all the resources you have accessed and used to complete your research task
•These resources include book resources such as: non-fiction books, journal articles, and newspaper reports as well as non-book resources such as websites.
 
Why bother with a bibliography?

You want to write a great bibliography because:

  1. It shows how much you have researched
  2. It gives proper credit to ideas that are not yours
  3. You avoid accusations of plagiarism
  4. Allows your teacher to verify your data
What is Plagiarism?
Plagiarism comes from a Latin word, which means ‘kidnap’
•Plagiarism is where a person takes someone else’s ideas, research or writing without acknowledgement and presents it as his or her own work
•Plagiarism is a type of theft. It is a criminal offence for which there are significant penalties
 
 
How can I make a bibliography?
  • You can make a bibliography as you go by creating a new page in Word called Bibliography and keep it open and copy paste the resources you use.
  • You can make a new folder in your bookmarks list, label it the name of your assignment and save all sites you look at into it.

HOW TO MAKE A BIBLIOGRAPHY

On a new page, add the heading Bibliography
Alphabetize your list by the authors surname, if there is no author, by the first letter of the title.

What to include for a book:

1. Author surname (comma) followed by first initial (full stop then comma)

2. Year of publication (comma)

3. Title of the book in italics

4. Edition of this book in italics inside brackets

5. Publisher (comma)

6. Place of publication (comma)

7. Page number

See the example below:

Heath, G, McKenzie, H & Tully L., 2010, Food Solutions Food and Technology Units 3 & 4 (Third Edition), Pearson Education, Sydney, p. 26

 

 What to include for a Magazine:

1.Title of the magazine in italics (comma)

2.Publisher (comma)

3.Place of publication (comma)

4. Date of publication (comma)

5. Volume number (vol.)

See the example below:

Gourmet Traveller, ACP Magazines Ltd, Sydney Australia, 30th March 2011, vol. 3

 

What to include for a website:

1. Title of the page in italics (colon)

2. URL, website address eg. www...(semi colon)

3. Date accessed

See the example below:

Meat and Livestock Australia: www.mla.com.au; 22nd May 2013

 

What to include for a television program:

1. Title of the program (comma)

2. Channel on which it was shown (comma)

3. Day of the week followed by date

 See the example below:

Jamie’s Thirty Minute Meals, Channel 10, Sunday 30th January 2011

 

What to include for an interview with an expert in the field:

1. Their name (comma)

2. Their position (comma)

3. Main cooking experience (comma)

4. Location of interview (comma)

 See the example below:

Shannon Bennett, Owner of Vue de Monde restaurant, Head Chef, Melbourne

 

Finished Bibliography example below:

 

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